Traveling With Your Pet

    You've decided to take your pet along on vacation. It will be more fun, and you won't have to worry about leaving a member of your family behind in an unfamiliar kennel. With some extra planning and forethought, you can have a safe and enjoyable trip with your pet.


Taking a Road Trip


If you're driving with your pet, you'll need to find a comfortable and safe way for your pet to travel. You can place your pet in a carrier and secure it in the carthecityloo.com/ . Alternatively, you can purchase a seatbelt-like harness for your pet that will allow him to be out of the carrier but still safely restrained. It isn't safe to allow your pet to roam freely in the car. He can be seriously hurt in the event of even a minor accident, and he is much more likely to escape and become lost when you make stops.


Don't leave your pet alone in the car, especially in hot weather. The heat can quickly become life-threatening. If your pet becomes carsick easily, you may want to ask your veterinarian for motion-sickness medicine before the trip.


Carry some of your pet's food along with you, and feed your pet only small amounts of food at a time. If your trip is short, you may want to have your pet wait and eat when you arrive to avoid carsickness. You should also carry some of your pet's water along, or purchase bottled water. Local tap water may contain different minerals or sulphur, which might upset your pet's stomach.


Flying with your pet


Many pet owners do not like to fly with their pets because it can be traumatic for them, but sometimes it's unavoidable. Unless your pet is very small, he will fly as cargo and not in the cabin with you. Check with your airline to determine what type of carrier is acceptable and what rules apply to flying with a pet. Also ask what safety precautions are in place, what conditions the pet will fly in, etc. Ask your veterinarian if your pet is well enough to fly or if there are any special precautions you should take.


International Travel


Taking your pet out of the country requires careful planning. Check the regulations for the country you are traveling to and verify that your pet has the required vaccinations. In some cases, you'll need to have the vaccines administred weeks before your departure date.


Most countries will require a Rabies Vaccination Certificate and a Health Certificate. Your veterinarian can help you obtain both of these. The country you are traveling to may require that you complete paperwork gaining permission to bring your pet into the country. Also, some countries have quarantine regulations that may require your pet to remain in a kennel for up to several months.


Pet Friendly Hotels


A quick search on the Internet can help you find hotels that are receptive to pets. Many travel sites also allow you to specify only pet-frienly accommodations. Check with the hotel to find their specific rules regarding staying with a pet.


If your pet requires walks, ask for a room that opens on the outside. This will be more convenient for those late night trips outdoors.


Many alternative lodging sites, such as resorts, cabins and bed and breakfasts are also open to receiving pets. Check ahead of time for availability where you're traveling. Since many of these vacation spots offer outdoor activities, they can be great options for pet owners.


What Will your Pet do All day?


You know how you'll travel, and you've found a hotel that will welcome your pet, so now what? What will your pet do all day when you're out having fun?


An outdoor vacation is an ideal choice if you're traveling with pets. Consider renting an RV and taking a camping vacation. Many RV rental agencies allow pets with an extra deposit. A trip to the beach is another good choice for pet owners. However, keep in mind that sand can be irritating to some pets, especially dogs with deep skin folds. Some animals are bothered by long sun exposure as well.


If you're spending a lot of time outdoors, keep plenty of cold water on hand and watch your pet for signs of heat exhaustion.


Some restaurants now provide outdoor seating that is also pet friendly. Check ahead of time if any are available near where you are staying. If you'd like to spend mealtime with your pet and no pet-friendly restaurants are close by, you might consider takeout or even picnicing outdoors.


What if you're taking a more traditional vacation? Many tourist attractions will not welcome your pet, and it isn't a good idea to leave your pet alone in a strange hotel room all day. You may be able to place your pet in his carrier for shorter excursions, but for all day trips, consider researching pet daycare centers or kennels available in the area. You can leave your pet for a few hours in a safe environment but still enjoy his company on your trip.


What to Take Along


Bring your pet's food along or plan to buy it as needed. This is not a good time to change your pet's diet, and you should certainly avoid giving your pet any table scraps. Traveling can be stressful regardless of how careful you are, and you don't need the added complication of stomach upset for your pet.


Don't give your dog the local water, especially if you're traveling internationally. It's safer to give your pet only bottled water to avoid possible stomach upset.


Bring along any medicines your pet takes, including vitamins, flea medicines, heart worm prescriptions, etc. You should also bring some basic first-aid supplies in case of injury. Ask your veterinarian what should be included in your pet's first aid kit. These might include medicines for stomach upset and a mild tranquilizer in case your pet becomes extremely agitated. You can purchase pre-stocked pet first aid kits at many pet supply stores.


To make your pet more comfortable, bring along a few items from home. Bring some of your pet's bedding and a few of his favorite toys. Bring only treats your pet has eaten in the past with no stomach upset. Again, this isn't the time to try any new foods. The carrier you bring should be large enough for your pet to remain comfortably inside for a few hours. He should be able to stand, lie down and turn around easily within it. Also, be sure your pet has fresh water available within the carrier.


A Pre-Trip Checklist


Make an appointment with your veterinarian. Have your pet examined and any vaccinations done that are needed. Ask if your pet is healthy enough to travel, and ask for advice concerning any of your pet's health conditions. Remember that if you are traveling outside the country, you may need to plan weeks in advance.


Make sure your pet has current identification attached to his collar, and that it fits well and isn't likely to slip off. You might want to consider having an identification chip implanted before your trip, but you'll need to discuss with your veterinarian how soon your pet can travel after the procedure.


Gather phone numbers for veterinarians, pet emergency care facilities, kennels, etc. before you leave for each place where you'll be staying. If an accident or illness does occur, you'll be grateful that you don't have to take the time to find someone to care for your pet.


Make a packing list for your pet based on his needs and what your veterinarian recommends. Double-check it as you pack his things. Take your veterinarian's phone number along with you in case you need to call and ask a last minute question or have your pet's records sent to another clinic.


Take time to get your pet used to his carrier, especially if it's new. If you're driving, take your pet in the car for practice trips before the big day so it won't be so traumatic. Another benefit to this approach is that you'll learn if your pet become motion sick easily.


If you're traveling with your cat, bring a litterbox and litter along with you. It's easier to purchase cheap plastic litterboxes and throw them away rather than try to clean and transport them. If traveling with a dog, be sure to bring baggies to clean up after your pet's walks.


Embarrassing and Alarming Moments


Pets get stressed when traveling, so accidents can and will happen. Bring some disposable wipes and plastic baggies to clean up after your pet. Another good idea is bringing a small bottle of enzyme based cleaner. If your pet selects the hotel carpet as the perfect spot for his accident, this can remove the odor and stain before it has a change to set.


Never open your pet's carrier unless you're in an enclosed room. Pets can move much more quickly than you can, and nothing will ruin your vacation faster than losing your traveling companion.


Traveling with your pet can be challenging, but with some planning ahead, it can also be a fun and rewarding experience. Trying a short weekend trip before a longer vacation can also help your pet acclimate to travel, and you will learn how well your pet travels.

So you've had your dog or cat for a while, and your life is changing, and now you think you need to get rid of your pet. But are you sure this is what you want to do? Getting rid of your pet is a very drastic measure. If you leave your pet at a shelter, you may think he will find a new home soon. But it is unlikely. Many high-kill shelters must euthanize animals each day in order to make room for new ones who have come in. Some animals are only at the shelter for four or five days before they run out of luck. Fifty-six percent of dogs and seventy-six percent of cats in shelters are euthanized... many of them healthy, well-behaved animals whose owners simply didn't have time for them anymore. Even in a no-kill shelter, your pet may be doomed to live out the rest of his life in a small cage if he is not chosen for adoption.

If you are willing to try keeping your pet, there are many things you can do. Lets look at some of the most common reasons why people get rid of their pets, and how to get around them.


Reason 1: I'm moving.

Solution: Bring your pet with! A quick Google search for "pet-friendly housing" will show you many different directories of rental housing that allows pets. Here are just a few that I found: People With Pets, Pets Welcome, My New Place, Pets911, Home With Pets, and Dog House Properties. And pet-friendly housing is not just limited to those sites! Many apartment buildings and complexes will allow pets. You may have to pay an extra security deposit. But in the end, it will be worth it, to keep your pet with you!

Here is something else you should know. If things get really bad and you have no place to live, you still may not have to give up your pet. Pets Of The Homeless is a website that works to help homeless people to keep their pets, or find temporary homes for their pets until they get back on their feet.


Reason 2: I can no longer afford my pets.

Solution: Call your local animal shelter, or food pantry, and ask about pet food banks. They do exist, and are becoming more and more common! You can even make your own dog food, which may be cheaper in the long run. (Its not difficult! Dogs can eat much of the same things we eat!) Your local animal shelter, or your veterinarian, may also be able to tell you about free or low cost vet care for your pets.


Reason 3: My new boyfriend/girlfriend/fiance/roommate doesn't like pets.

Solution: Are you really going to sacrifice your pet on someone else's whim? Are you sure you want to date someone or live with someone who doesn't like pets? That's a pretty big lifestyle change to make for someone else. If you're sure you want to stick with this person, work out a compromise. Maybe your pet can be banned from certain areas of the house, like the bedroom or the kitchen.


Reason 4: My new boyfriend/girlfriend/fiance/roommate is allergic to my pet.

Solution: As long as the person's allergy isn't life threatening, there are many things you can do to greatly reduce the allergens on your pet. Keeping your house clean is a giant step. Dust and vacuum frequently, and use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter if possible. You can buy an air filter for your home that sucks the allergens out of the air. A company called AllerPet makes a special liquid that you can wipe your pet down with regularly to get rid of the allergens on him. Sprinkling flax seeds in your pet's food can also reduce the amount of dander he produces. The person may even be willing to take allergy medication! After all, many people have seasonal allergies and take medicine regularly. They don't just get rid of the seasons!


Reason 5: We're having a baby.

Solution: Pets and children are a great combination! Most pets are perfectly fine around children, although they may be a little confused by the new arrival at first. You should always supervise your pet around young children. When your child is an infant, he probably won't be unsupervised anyways, right? As your child gets older, you will have to teach the child to be gentle with the pets. Do not allow your child to pull your pet's tail, poke him, pick him up, etc. Many people feel that a pet should be obligated to put up with whatever your child deals out. But that is not good for anyone involved! Teaching your child, from a young age, to be calm and nurturing around pets, is a great learning experience for the child. If you have a dog, you may want to do some extra training with him before the baby comes, to teach him not to jump up on you when you're holding the baby, etc. Other measures may include banning the pets from certain areas of the house, hiring someone to come walk your dogs or clean up after your pets when you don't have time to, etc.


Reason 6: I have developed health problems.

Solution: Speak to your veterinarian, neighbors, friends, people at your place of worship, etc. You can probably find some volunteers to help you take care of your pet. Having a pet can be a source of comfort when you are ill. In fact, many studies have shown that people with pets have lower blood pressure, lower heart rates, and are generally more healthy, than those without pets. If your health problems are so severe that you must move into a nursing home, maybe you can find someone willing too foster your pet for you.


Reason 7: My pet has developed costly health problems.

Solution: Speak to your veterinarian about this. They may be able to guide you to low cost veterinary clinics, veterinary schools that offer low cost treatment, etc. Many veterinary offices now offer payment plans for treatment. They may be able to help you find creative ways of raising money to pay for your pet's treatment, too!


Reason 8: My pet still isn't house trained.

Solution: If your pet is suddenly having "accidents" around the house when he used to be house trained, there could be a medical reason. You may want to consult your veterinarian. If the house training has just never completely been accomplished, you may have to start over from scratch. For a dog, take him out more frequently and try to get him on a schedule. If you are not home during the day, and your dog is eliminating on the floor or furniture while you are gone, you may want to consider crating him while you are not home. For a cat, switching to a different kind of litter, getting a bigger litter box, or moving the litter box to a different area of the house, can help. Clean up accidents with a mixture of vinegar and water. This mixture gets rid of the scent of urine or poop, so that the pet doesn't feel the need to "mark" that area again.


Reason 9: I work long hours, and don't have much time to spend with my pet. Its not fair to him.

Solution: While it may seem unfair that your pet has to spend time alone, it is still better than making him take his chances in a shelter! There are simple measures, such as providing stimulating toys for your pets, or leaving the TV on during the day, that can help your pet to feel less lonely. One nice thing you can do is buy your pet a special blanket. Sleep with it in your bed for a few nights before you give it to your pet. It will smell like you, and offer comfort to your pet when you are away from the house! You may also want to consider pet day care, or hiring someone to stop in during the day to play with your pets. Also, spending as little as fifteen minutes before you leave for work, just playing with your pet and spending quality time with him, can make a real difference. You don't have to be a perfect owner and spend tons of time hanging out with your pet. He will love you the way you are... and again, it is better to be alone at your home than to die alone in a shelter.


Reason 10: My pet has behavior problems. He bites/scratches/jumps on me, barks too much, etc.

You may want to consider a training class for yourself and your pet. Petco and Petsmart offer fairly inexpensive training classes. It can be a good investment! If you can't afford this, then the library can provide books on dog training, and the Internet can provide websites with tips. Try Googling a specific problem you're having. For instance, search for "teach dog to stop barking." Spending ten or fifteen minutes a day working with your dog, and then consistently rewarding your dog for positive behavior, can make a huge difference.


These are just a few of the common reasons why people consider giving up their pets. But remember, every problem has a solution. So, before you give up on your pet, please take some time to remedy the problems!






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